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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 384 (some duplicates have been removed)
that has helped expedite this thing with terrorism and their attacks on the united states? is it one person or many? who is responsible? >> i don't think there's a nickel's worth of difference between the two policies in terms of foreign policy. the first president bush, mr. clinton, the sec and mr. bush and mr. obama have made it their business to light to the american people, to insist we are being attacked because of what we think here in north america or how we lived rather than with united states government has done. the core of the problem is intervention in other people's business. part of that intervention is unfortunately necessary. we have to defend the saudis and operate because we depend on oil. our support of israel and our intervention in south sudan, the relentless intervention of the united states on issues that are not very important to it is because of what is going on and it is a bipartisan stimulus. it's not just one person. until we stop that war think about stopping at, there is no chance to stop this war and that is why so much about kite has spread so greatly since 2
. as the president said, preventing a nuclear iran is in the interest of the united states. we have issued reports, and the most recent one was issued on and.ary 1 and it includes a distinguished panel of four democratic members of congress, admirals' and generals and also experts to area our last report supported the view that the best approached to this challenge is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is of diplomacy, tough sanctions, and a credible and invisible military threat. we also issued a white paper on each of those tracks. i want to highlight one recommendation on each of those tracks, and then i will change it over to mort zuckerman. and the military threat we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its military to air around us nuclear facilities, and we have spelled out how to do so. one element has been selling bunker busters' to israel. we do not advocate an israeli strike, but this will send a strong signal to tehran to negotiate in good faith, encourage other states that the alternative to supporting u.s. sanctions could be military conflict
geopolitics -- host: oil and gas production in the western hemisphere is booming, with the united states emerging less dependent on supplies from an unstable middle east. vens, nigeria, and mexico. host: southeast michigan. what are gas prices like there, dave? caller: very good. someone saying on your show that prices were falling for the holidays. that's not true here in southeast michigan, which people here like to drive a lot up north. we have a wonderful, beautiful up north. but the prices here average in the low $3.90's. they were a week ago in the mid $3.60, around there. for my employees, it's all the same for them. we're traveling 60 mile an hour round trips and that really hits the pocketbook when you're having to travel every day for week. i'll companies are certainly quick to bring the price down. thanks and have a good holiday. host: it's not our oil that we're talking about, it belongs to oil companies. new hampshire, john on our democrats line joins us. hi. caller: just one note i've acknowledged over the last few weeks. we have a caller on your show, but he was discussing
-2012 there will be no war, no deal. this is a to 13 problem. and ultimately it will be a problem with the united states fundamentally is going to have to wrestle with. syria, the situation there will continue until two things occur. number one, the russians can be dissuaded from their policy of backing -- and there would be some fundamental change on the ground. right now you don't even have a hurting stalemate. you have a situation where the regime still controls the issuance of state power. the opposition will not break but neither can it cause the regime to break. now what to do about this. this of course is the great co-none drum. what do we do? here again i am a believer. in the united states determines that it is in its vital national interest to remove this regime, then it should act comprehensively and decisively in an effort to do it. if it does not believe it it is in the vital national interest to resume it and in my judgment it is not a vital national interest, we should stay out and certainly not adopt the kind of half-baked ill advised, half measures that will get us into a military commi
the veto word is not used, also not used in the constitution of the united states but no one doubts the president has it. we have the ability to do it to the language that is there. that will become a bit more clear as we come forward. >> thank you, chairman kerry. i'm very glad that we're having this in today and i appreciate all of you for being here. senator webb and i sent chairman kerry and ranking member luber a letter back in april urging we move forward to consideration of law of the sea treaty and i'm grateful to your broad and searching and supportive testimony here today. when i was brand-new to the senate, one of the earlier meetings i took was with the then outgoing chief of naval operations. when i asked him what is the single most important thing we can do to help the navy over the next decade, he said without hesitation, ratify the law of the sea treaty. i was taken aback by the. given other budget priorities, operational issues, as it turned out admiral estimation of the importance of this issue is shared i'm stomach every living chief of naval operations not to men
: >> everybody wants to stay healthy. when i moved to the united states almost three years ago i could not find one that worked for me. i became inspired to bring a new definition of quality to the world. today it's working to fulfill our mission of bringing omega 3s to everyone because omega 3s are essential to life. >> citi turns 200 this year. in that time, there have been some good days and some difficult ones. but through it all, we persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. >> bnsf railway. >. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the mystery surrounding an escaped chinese dissident de
weekend, the united states faces military and diplomatic challenges. we will discuss stalled talks with iran and continuing tensions with pakistan, and the war in afghanistan. with one of the g.o.p.'s leading voices on foreign policy, senate john mccain. then, catholic institutions take the obama administration to court. over its insurance mandate on contraception. is it an issue of religious freedom? or women's health? we will ask a top church official pushing the legal challenge, cardinal wuerl archbishop of washington. plus, are president obama attacks on governor romney's business record working? and our power player of the week, a remarkable story of devotion to country and sacrifice you will not want to miss. all right now. on fox news sunday. and hello again on this memorial day weekend. from fox news in washington. as we remember those who is given their lives defending our country, we continue to face foreign policy challenges. here to tackle all of that is senator john mccain. welcome back to fox news sunday. >>guest: thank you for having me on especially memorial day. >>
of the united states refused to speak up on behalf of the demonstrators in the streets in tehran, and it has gone from one episode to another. we have over a year and now talking about possibly vetting some people. look, nearly 10,000 people have died this is a brutal regime of incredible proportions, and, by the way, if as sad fails in it would be the greatest blow to iran in the last 25 years because it would cut off the hezbollah, syria's most important client state, et cetera. but, look, horrible things are happening in syria and this administration has a feckless foreign policy which abandons american leadership. i know because i visit with these people, they are ready to help these people. they are already helping them some but it cries out for american leadership, and american leadership is not there. >>chris: there is a story on the front page of "new york times" that president obama is considering trying to get assad out diplomatically with the help of the russians. how likely is that? >>guest: again, he are here a year later, 10,000 killed and the main supplier of arms to assad, we
to -- to the 209,145 soldiers and officers that were officially mustered into the bureau of the united states troops. attention was brought to how these soldiers were organized, how they fought, and what they accomplished in the civil war. attention was brought to an african descent community that fought to save the union and free themselves by enforcing the emancipation proclamation. attention was brought to -- to an organized community that planned for and executed that plan to end the tyranny of slavery and lead with the constitution and to gain the rights of citizens in league with the constitution, attention was brought to one of the best kept secrets in american history. now if the overt story of the soldiers and sailors, guides, scouts, spies, nurses, was -- was one of the best kept secrets in american history. then the covert story is a secret within a secret. within the best kept secret. and when we talk about women in the civil war, african descent women in the civil war that is another layer of one of those best kept secrets in american history. one of those untold stories. tonight
station. he said three sthings, two of them were, it is very clear to the world that the united states has lost and that's why the united states as everyone knows, the united states is begging the taliban to come -- just sit down and negotiate with us. please. we know you've murdered thousands of americans. we get that. that's ok. just sit down with us. we'll keep releasing you murdering thugs if you just agree to sit down with us and talk. we'll even buy you a wonderful office in qatar so you will have international international prestige to spread whatever goodwill you wish to spread. that would be known, mr. speaker , the president would pay attention, that would be known as radical jihad. that is what they wish to spread. here's a news report today from foxnews.com from kabul, the u.s. has been secretly releasing captured taliban fighters from a detention center in afghanistan in a bid to strengthen its hand in peace talks with the insurgent group, the "washington post" reported monday. who in the world has ever studied history comes around and says we are releasing the murdering thugi
the number one strategic threat to the united states. that sounds very yesteryear i must say. we will have other panels talk about russia but i don't think anyone will buy on to that proposition and as for china, we all know that china is an easy target in some ways, but we have already mentioned people -- the wise heads of the republican party. i can assure you just read henry kissinger's latest book on china and candidate mitt romney will get a lot of advice between now and when it gets anywhere near the convention not to mention the white house to go easy on china. one reason i am puzzled by it is that will not win an election. it is the economy. >> you want to pick up on this? >> there are a lot of things about the nature of the challenge that we face. i start with the point that the economy is more dependent on the global economy than in the past and the collective action challenge homi talked about is real. i differ when i look at successful administrations. the republicans run as if american power unfettered from multilateral institutions is the way to run the world. they enter offi
's that asymmetry between israel -- between the united states and israel that means these gaps are not closed. if i had one word, if you had to take one phrase from this talk, the clocks are not synchronized. and that is the concern because of this asymmetry in the military capability. now, israel's window close at the end of this year? we don't know. i tend to agree with aaron miller that there is no imminent attack. israel wants to see how it plays itself out. there's now disproceed proceed massey. unclear if a deal will be done. israel's fear is that the iranians try to create a wedge, do just enough to encourage the united states that these talks are going somewhere but not enough that that will make -- that it will be decisive. for example, if iran agrees to ship out their enriched uranium at 20% enrichment, will israel agree that as an interim, some people say interim, withere is end, that iran can enrich at a lower level. i'm not a nuclear physicist, but the hardest part is nuclear fuel. anything certainly below 20% is hard to do. but that's only reactor grade fuel. to go up to high enrich u
activist later said he wanted to go to the united states with his family, forcing the two governments to resume negotiations over his fate. chen earlier asked for a meeting with u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. testifying by telephone before a u.s. congressional commission, he said he no longer feels safe in china and wants to leave for the united states. >> the activist said he wants to meet clinton, who is visiting beijing, to seek further support and to thank her face to face. >> your case is the test, the test of the chinese commitment to protect you, which they've given. we're very dubious about those assurances. >> the commission chairman said the u.s. congress will take up the issue adding that the american commitment to the human rights is being put to the test. >>> south korea is reporting more disruptions to its satellite-based global positioning system are affecting air travel and shipping. a south korean official tells nhk that disruptions apparently originate from north korea. south korean maritime police say more than 120 vessels including patrol boats in the yel
between the united states and japan. today, we welcome you in that spirit. i have worked to strengthen the ties between our two nations. when prime minister noda and i met, we talk about strengthening. i want to thank you for the personal commitment you have brought to this endeavor. you have called the united states is japan's greatest asset. through our determination and humility we have seen this through. during our discussions today, the prime minister compared his leadership style to that of a point guard in basketball. he may not be flashy, but he stays focused and gets the job done. that has helped make this visit a milestone. am proud to announce we have agreed to a new joint vision to help shape the asian-pacific for decades to come. this is part of a broader effort i discussed in which the united states is, once again, beating in the asian-pacific region. this will remain the foundation of the security and foundations -- security and prosperity of our two nations and a cornerstone of regional peace and security. we reviewed the agreement that we reached last week to realign a
bin laden and had great concerns about plotting attacks in the west, including in the united states. we know that a range of individuals like richard clarke were ringing alarm bells at the white house level. again, at that point, when we go back and look, it administration at that point was focused on things like the balkans and the kosovo war which was 1999. >> putting out fires elsewhere in the national security arena. >> yes. >> you talk about this wave of al qaeda violence. then they get beaten back. sometimes because of their own actions. what caused the temporary defeat the first time? was a launch into afghanistan? >> actually, it is almost the reverse of what we just outlined. the host that they had, the taliban regime, was overthrown. in addition to that, we saw the u.s. approach that was focused mostly on clandestine services. the cia come in a range of other intelligence services in a geospatial way, and special operations forces targeting in afghanistan and in afghanistan and other locations. >> we are talking about in 2001 how the united states fought back by sending in
with the united states in pursuing an outcome that would limit the itu's involvement in internet governance. can you tell us what the extent of this collaboration is and how are these governments, other governments working with the u.s. to achieve this goal? because it seems to me that we have a lot of people, a lot of countries, a lot of states, nation-states, that are -- let me put it in a more positive way -- don't share our view of the internet and how it operates and how it should continue to operate. so how is our collation doing? and can you do a little bit of a dive on telling us where you think we are with other countries, which is so important? and then i'd like commissioner mcdowell, maybe you can give us a wicket 101. how many are going to vote? is there a time frame around this? is it discussion that begins this year and extend for the next 24 years? they only meet once -- the last time they met was almost a quarter of a century ago. so i'd like to -- i think maybe the committee, if -- maybe some already know. i'm not so sure i understand how the itu actually is going to work when w
into the united states. why? because when it was developed in the 1940s, it was thought, this is a propaganda arm of the u.s. government. and it would be inconsistent with our notions of freedom of the press in the united states to allow them to use that propaganda that we're bringing to the rest of the world and to come back and show it to u.s. citizens. that is a bizarre notion in today's world. it's also i think quite inconsistent with the first amendment. and really ought to be changed. it's just another example of how we are living with a set of ideas about information and journalism -- >> so out of date. >> -- that is the last century. and we don't have national plans for how to be part of a global economy. we don't have national plans about how to be part of it in terms of information and ideas. >> but before we see a little bit of video from around the world, i have to bring us -- i realize you said let's try to ignore political realities at this moment. but despite the unity among the panelists of the need for more public funding of journalism, the simpson-bowles recommendation for the p
be a more dangerous world if the united states were less involved and contributing less to the people and stability and had a weaker deterrent and less ability to dissuade people from engaging in the kinds of adventures that they would avoid were the united states seen as capable, engaged, and contributing to peace and stability. >> next question. mr. faust. >> earlier when you were speaking you mentioned that it's a -- >> this is not fair. they've got computers. he's sitting there reading. >> i can see it, mr. secretary. there's cartoons on it. >> that's a relief. okay. >> but earlier you mentioned, you said it's a battle of ideas referring to the war on terror and similar to the soviet union. but if that's the case, then shouldn't we be worried less about going to war and pre-emptive strikes and those measures and working more on soft power and making -- and focusing inward on america itself so that that way we'll be a country that people want to look up to and be like. because we're suffering from i'd say a lot of maladies right now that make other countries say oh, it doesn't seem
the massacre in houla friday. the united states signaled it would continue down the diplomatic path to end the bloodshed in syria. but right now the violence is expected to continue. bill: . there is a warning if diplomacy fails the wider region could be drawn into a bigger war. >> reporter: in israel there is a concern about what might happen next. susan rice was talking to the united nations saying if the larger diplomatic push fails, the wider region could be pulled into the conflict. the iranian government says if the united states or other countries intervene militarily in syria, israel will be attacked. there is a concern about israel and iran in terms of the nuclear issue. there is a lot of concern in the middle east about what happens next. right now it is a diplomatic push by the united states and the diplomatic community and the u.n. this seems to be the on real option anybody is considering. right now military intervention is off the table for most of the international community, bill. martha: with that violence escalating by the day, we are getting more images of the civilians
a charge of its ow& destiny. an awakened public opinion that basically opposes not only the united states, any kind of control and domination, including the authoritarian leadership? the region and i think's uncertainty now but once the dust settles in the arab world you're going to have a new world. a new world that basically will not accept america's dominance. >> rose: rumsfeld and gerges when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: donald rumsfeld is here he was secretary of defense under president george w. bush from 2000 to 2006. he resigned in the midst ofest schrating public criticism of the iraq war. rumsfeld began his career in the 1960s as a three-term congressman from illinois. he joined president richard nixon's cabinet and served under presidents ford, reagan and bush 43. his memoir "known and unknown" is now out in paper back and it chronicles everything as his time as a middle east envoy to one of the president's closestt% foreign policy advisors. as the u.s. ends tour two wars and faces tur
on one thing. when you leave the east coast of the united states, you can drive for miles from state to state and not see another black face. call to montana, utah, parts of oregon and washington -- there are lots of african americans in this country but there are parts where there are none. on the broader issue, that is certainly true. the president has done a lot for not just african americans but for everyone in the country. the health-care bill, the stimulus package. we were losing 800,000 jobs a month. the shift has been helpful for everyone. you cannot count on the all.dent to do with allit you have to start a small business and take the risk of willing to fail. there are conditions that exist, but government cannot solve all those problems. they have to be solved at the committee level. host: teresa is a republican from trenton, new jersey. caller: hi. i was listening -- i really love you. you're a great democratic strategist and i love your opinions and have you correct other people and bring them back to what the heart of the problem is. thank you for that. in order for us t
in the southwest united states, where cities that were, if you take certain cities on the edge of california, on their edge of los angeles, for example, that were -- had a conventional post war democratic and have now become 90 to 95% hispanic, this is a democratic that wasn't even in the 1960 u.s. census. that's actually a big transformation in a fairly short space of time. and it has consequences. now, when you put the why, i would do you care, that's the benign view. people think -- we were talking about broadway just we went on air. that's like the production of holiday pel low doll -- "hello dolly" and then he ran out of brassy, middle-aged blonds, and then he changed it to an all-black cast, and people think that's what happened if you have a muslim netherlands or muslim britain, there will be fewer pubs, the pubs will have to close, but essentially it will basically still be the same, and i don't think that's -- no serious person would argue that. >> host: on the cover of the new paperback version of "america alone" there's a little sticker, soon to be banned in canada. >> guest: that
other have worked together back in the 1990's?" maybe this is a complement to the united states. guest: cooperation between two countries is good. mill to mill relationships which we have lots of countries including countries that are not our closest friends, we used to have these relationships with pakistan and we stopped at our peril in our relationship with pakistan and that has declined as you are well aware relationships, especially like economic dialogue like hillary clinton and secretary of the treasury tim geithner had in beijing are very good things. what we should watch and a dangerous time his cooperative relationships where we will have competition like china and russia. that is what we should try to achieve. if we were doing and in the late 1990's, that is a good thing. host: this question is from twitter - guest: first of all, i don't call it the arabis spring. -- the arab spring. i called the arab awakening. the organizing events is the birth of the arab citizen. think about that. citizens of mellon fell other officials have not done well in egypt yes. it is an important
with people who spend all their time debating about what is the al qaeda core today. we in the united states are in need of instant gratification. i have four seasons believe me, they are in need of instant gratification. our adversaries work on a much longer time frame. right now it's one thing, tomorrow next week, next month it's potentially something very different. i'm a little bit tired with those who are only interested in assessing where is the al qaeda core. a group that had been floundering because it was working on a budget of a fuel thousand dollars and now they've got tens of millions of dollars. my biggest fear is the trend in homegrown violence extremism. the reason that keeps me up at night is because my time in the intelligence community and in law enforcement lead me to believe that we are best capability at thwarting the next attack when people who are plotting the next attack may set off one of the trip wires in place. travel or communication or moving or receiving money. but if we're trying to deal with people who have no job or dumped by their girlfriend and are looking
attack in the united states in view of taking oath not to harm it when he was awarded his american citizenship. he responded that he lied when he took the oath. that shahzad's lie amount to betrayal and does not fall under permissible lying if the enemy during times of war. please request that pakistani taliban brothers to address this matter. also draw their attention to the fact that brother faisal shahzad appeared in photograph alongside commander f masoud. leader of attp. when he acquires american citizenship this requires taking an oath to not to harm america if he is unaware of this matter he should be informed of it. we must act swiftly to remove the suspicion that he engaged in the betrayal. the times square attempted attack was not only one that had the al qaeda no hand in pakistan. it is clear from the letters that the group's indiscriminate attacks, pakistani taliban's indiscrimenant attacks against muslims were of major concern to al qaeda. this led them to write a letter to respected brother massoud, the leader of the ttp. the authors explicitly stated that the satisfa
as an officer in the united states air force. after 26 years at the c.i.a. and national security council, he became president of texas and, a, many university. in 2006, president george w. bush appointed him sex tear of defense succeeding donald rumsfeld. under his watch, gates oversaw iraq's troop surge. president-elect obama asked him to stay in the job. he became the first defense secretary to serve both a republican and democratic president. in the obama administration he played a pivotal role in shaping u.s. policy in afghanistan. he was a key player in the decision to send additional forces into the country. he was at the center of the debate on the raid to kill osama bin laden last may. gates stepped down as defense secretary in june, 2011. here is what president obama said at gates' farewell ceremony. >> what you see is a man that i've come to know and respect. a humble american patriot. a man of common sense and decency. quite simply one of our nation's finest public servants. >> reporter: i talked with bob gates in williamsburg virginia at the college of william & mary where he acc
plotting attacks in the west including in the united states. we know that a range of individuals like richard park had alarm bells ringing at the white house level, but, again, at that point, when we go back and look, the administration at that point was focused on things like the balcans and fires elsewhere. >> host: in the national security arena. now, you talk about this wave of al-qaeda violence, and then they get beaten back. sometimes, because of their own actions, what caused the kind of temporary defeat the first time? was it our launch on afghanistan? >> guest: well, actually, it's about the reverse of the coin we just outlined. they lost the sanctuary in afghanistan so the host they had, the taliban regime, was overthrown, and in addition to that, we saw a u.s. approach that was focused mostly on services, the cia, the range of other intelligence services, nsa, geospatial, and then in special operational forces targeting in afghanistan and then in pakistan and other locations. >> host: you're talking about in 2001, how the u.s. fought back by sending in cia and special force
plotting attacks in the west including in the united states. we know that a range of individuals like clark had alarm bells at the level, but when we go back and look the administration at the plant was focused on things like the balkans and the kosovo war which was 1999, some issues other than -- >> host: putting out fires elsewhere in the national security arena. now, you talk about this wave of al qaeda violins and then they get beaten back. sometimes because of their own actions. what caused the kind of temporary defeat the first time? was it our launch into afghanistan? >> guest: it's almost a reverse of the coin we just outlined. they lost the sanctuary afghanistan so the hope they had, the taliban regime was overthrown, and in addition to that, we saw a u.s. approach focused on the clandestine services. the cia, the range of other intelligence services, geospatial and then in the special operations forces targeting in afghanistan and then in pakistan and other locations. >> host: you're talking about in 2001 how the u.s. fought by sending in the cia and special forces working togethe
the united states government our embassy been able to in any way make contact with your extended family and friends who are at grave risk and suffering beatings crux >> [speaking chinese] i'm not free career on the specifics, but i do know the u.s. embassy has been communicating with me everyday. >> your wife and children, how well are they doing on this enormous burden clacks >> [speaking chinese] mcminn they're doing fine especially my children, my wife and i that this is such a wonderful place we can play outside, and he said you can tell from what they told my wife and i held terrible back to our home town. >> [speaking chinese] >> translator: because my wife and children have been under such a long time of difficulty with of the nutrition and lubber and pressure -- low blood pressure and when i saw them under the circumstances i felt very saddened. >> [speaking chinese] the panel witnesses to suggest to hire his own lawyers not to accept the government appointed lawyers for his family members. >> i am wondering whether there is any lawyer that has been accepted to be. we have heard
dissident who says he wants to seek asylum in the united states. the administration says chen ga gaunchung left at his request. >> michele bachmann and rick santorum finally make peace with governor romney? new poll numbers tell a is your rising truth about the republican right. >>> fast moving developments surrounding chinese human rights activist, chen guangcheng. he has been pleading for help and asking to come to the united states with the family. he left the safe haven of the u.s. embassy on monday but says officials misled him. he had a congressional hearing and described the conditions at his home. >> translator: i really am afraid for my other family members' life. they have installed seven video cameras. even with the electric fence. >> among those watching closely, president obama's campaign opponent, mitt romney. >> the reports are, if they are accurate, that our administration, willingly or unwittingly, communicated would chen an implicit threat to his family and probably or may have sped up the process of his decision to leave the embassy. if these reports are true, this is a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 384 (some duplicates have been removed)